Participants in a guided peer support group had significantly fewer negative symptoms of psychosis.

More info: An 8 month randomized controlled study compared GPSG (Guided Peer Support Groups) with a wait-list condition (WLC). Patients had a clinical diagnosis of schizophrenia or a related psychotic disorder and were 18 years of age or older. All outcomes were self-reported, and were measured before the group started and after the last meeting at 8 months. From the source: “In fact, the participants in the experimental condition had...

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85% of participants in a guided peer support group reported that the group fulfilled their expectations.

More info: An 8 month randomized controlled study compared GPSG (Guided Peer Support Groups) with a wait-list condition (WLC). Patients had a clinical diagnosis of schizophrenia or a related psychotic disorder and were 18 years of age or older. All outcomes were self-reported, and were measured before the group started and after the last meeting at 8 months. From the source: “Almost all participants (85%) reported that the intervention...

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Involvement with peer mentors is associated with better social functioning and community adjustment.

More info: 60 individuals with a mental health diagnosis of “schizophrenia,” “schizoaffective disorder,” or “bipolar disorder” and at least one psychiatric hospitalization were followed for 7 months. Social functioning and employment of problem-centered coping strategies were higher amongst those who participated in peer-run programs and self-help groups than amongst people who received only services as usual from their Community...

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A schizophrenia study from the 1970s showed those treated with psychosocial care and limited use of antipsychotics had a lower relapse rate and earlier discharge date than those who received psychiatric treatment-as-usual with a neuroleptic.

More info: 80 young men diagnosed with “schizophrenia” were followed for 3 years.  Those treated without drugs were discharged sooner than participants who received the neuroleptic (chlorpromazine), and only 35% of those treated without drugs experienced relapse within a year of discharge.  45% of those treated with the neuroleptic  experienced relapse. From the source: “This study indicates that among young acute schizophrenic males...

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In the 20-year period between 1987 and 2007, the number of adults receiving Social Security income from the federal government because they were “disabled” by a psychiatric disorder increased by more than 200%.

More info: In 1987, there were 1.25 million adults receiving an SSI or SSDI payment from the federal government because they were “disabled” by mental illness. In 2007, there were 3.97 million adults on SSI [Supplemental Security Income] or SSDI [Supplemental Security Disability Income] for this reason.  This analysis of Social Security Administration data was conducted by Robert Whitaker in Anatomy of an Epidemic.  The figure is adjusted...

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Medicaid’s cost for ADHD drugs rose dramatically in the past decade, mostly driven by off-label use of antipsychotics for ADHD in youth.

More info: The authors examined a large, state Medicaid database between 1996 and 2005to determine spending on medications for 107,486 children (3 to 17 years old) diagnosed with ADHD . Spending on stimulant medications increased 157% during this period due to increases in the price of prescriptions; during this time, there was a 588% increase in antipsychotic spending due to large increases in price and quantity used. From the...

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